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to be suspicious suggesting it was a suicide. this scandal is rocking britain but seems ready to explode here in the united states. the fbi investigating whether a news corp journalist tried to hack into the phones of 9/11 victims and survivors. calls in congress for a investigation. the fbi also says it's aware of reports that actor jude law's phone was hacked while he was in new york. the scandal shows no sign of slowing down. quite the contrary. possibly being replaced as the ceo of his own media empire. a man whose customer base is the whole world. anyone who watches "glee" or reads the "wall street journal" or anyone that goes to the movies or reads books. we have jeffrey toobin and matthew chance. and brian stelter. brian, we'll start with you, rupert murdoch stepping down in the world of media, that's a wow. true or maybe? >> right now it's a maybe. news corp will not deny the bloomberg report on the record. what they say on background, people around the company say there was no meeting today to talk about it. you can tell that's not a real denial. they may want this out here before th
is very much in britain. >> there's no shortage of people in the american media establishment and the american political establishment who have taken issue with the fact that the properties, fox news and the "new york post" have done business. that said, we've got to be careful. usually you don't want to get ahead of yourselves. in this one the story has each time surpassed your wildest expectations in the past two weeks. >> happened again this morning. >> absolutely right. i would say in terms of the american implications there's a question of whether british journalists for news corp broke the law here in 9/11. the evidence is scant. if the attorney general were to issue a wider ranging investigations, even actions that were illegal taken, for example, in great britain could reflect on the ability of news corp to hold on to american broadcasting licenses here. you could see repercussions under the question of the they interpreted as foreign officials being bribed as has been alleged with some substantive hearings. >> once you start an investigation, your don't know what kind
murdoch's newspapers in great britain now face their own accusations of appallinging wrong doing. their report target no less than the royal family and a former prime minister. in fact, gordon brown says the paper had links to criminals in order to hack into his bank accounts. and the medical records of his seriously ill son. meanwhile, members of parliament are demanding tough answers from police. how do they not uncover a hacking conspiracy that could mushroom to thousands of victims? let's get the latest from rivers live in london. they are asking murdoch and his son to testify? >> reporter: yeah. i mean, this is a pretty incredible development, inevitable, perhaps given the huge fury about the whole scandal. ruppert and rebecca brooks have been asked to appear before what is a select committee here which is a cross-party committee of members of parliament and can question people about a particular issue. the police involved in the current inquiry and in past inquiries have been questioned by a similar committee this morning. it's a pretty ferocious grilling that they get here
business in britain would be... would have been utterly beleaguered. it was he back in '86 that allowed newspaper innovation to come in. he took the "times" tabloid, everybody said he was crazy. this is a guy, for better or worse, who loves newspapers. and the "times" of london has been building up its foreign bureaus at a time. i mean, the "washington post" here is down to a handful. "chicago tribune" has known. he's been building up the foreign bureaus. he's had the courage to put up a pay wall and say "you've got to pay for what journalists do online." i wanted to point out that... ande's had tremendous courage in the very bold investments he's made. i spent along time with h 20 years ago when he was just embarking on sky b and fox here in the u.s. i don't like fox,ut to break theriopoly of the networks was an exaordinarily business achievement. now, fox's contribution to the situatioin the u.s. today is very damaging, i thin but as a bhed media executive, he has been the visionary, along with turner, i would say, of the last 20 to 30 years. >> rose: certainly in a global way. >> yea
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the phone hacking scandal in britain came full comes full circle today, with word that the "news of the world" tabloid will cease to publish after 168 years in business. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the news electrified britain-- sunday's edition of "news of the world"-- the most widely read english language newspaper in the world-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with le
become britain's answer to watergate. but this time, the bad guys are the newspaper men and women. hacking the phones not just of princes of the realm but also a 13-year-old murder victim, just to get a scoop. they allegedly did it with the help of corrupt police officers on the company payroll. already britain's top two policemen have resigned. now, the prime minister is in the cross hairs. david cameron is on the hot seat tomorrow. but today the focus was on the patriarch and his younger son, james. >> james and i would like to say how sorry we are for what has happened. >> reporter: both expressed regret. >> invading people's privacy by listening to their voicemail is wrong. paying police officece for information is wrong. >> it's a matter of great regret of mine, my father's and everyone at news corp. ration. >> reporter: they blamed n ns executives and reporters lower down the corp rate food chain. >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: among murdoch's most trusted employees, his own children, who ran multimillion dollar ch
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
company. news corp. saying lots of tabloids in britain engaged in all sorts of outrageous behavior. you have rupert murdoch saying this is the most humble day of his life. which will we believe? that he and management are sorry or this is being made too much of by the rest of the press? >> it's a great question, howie. i've spoken about this before. you have here a real problem. i believe rupert is sincerely, sincerely appalled and sorry that in the case of mill lee dowler which is really what brought this scandal about when it was revealed that a teenage girl's phone was tampered with in order to sell newspapers because readers might think she was still alive. >> are the critics going overboard as the "wall street journal" editorial suggests? i have only a few seconds here. >> the "wall street journal" had the right to say that i think because there are plenty of other stories in your own country, watergate, the pentagon papers, and in england the daily telegraph two years ago paid for stolen records to expose mp's stolen expenses. there is a certain complicitness in britain and here t
, and that means that we still have a big hole to fill. >> britain's phone hacking scandal reached prime minister cameron's office today. police arrested his one-time communications director, former "news of the world" editor, andy colson. allegations that the paper hacked the phones of celebrities and politicians cost colson his job at the "news of the world" back in 2007. he quit cameron's government in january as the scandal grew. the prime minister took responsibility for hiring colson, and called for government investigation into the paper's conduct. >> this is a wake-up call. over the decades, on the watch of both labor leaders and conservative leaders, politicians and the press have spent time courting support, not confront the problems. it's on my watch that the music has stopped. >> "news of the world" will fold after sunday's edition. the tabloid part of rupert murdoch's media empire which includes the waun"wall street journal," "new york post" and fox news. >> seven people and the gunman dead, grand rapids police say roderic dantzler opened fire at two different homes. dantzler's daugh
of the world" when the most disgraceful allegations took place. to many in britain she became the face of this scandal, right? >> reporter: yeah, now she has finally gone after days of sort of clinging on to her job by her fingernails with everyone from the prime minister downward saying she should go. finally, this morning, she did resign. that's not the end of the story yet. she and rupert and james murdoch all have to appear before a committee in the building behind me on tuesday and they will be grilled by politicians who want some answers as to who knew what and when. >> dan rivers live out of london, we will follow the fallout, of course, from that resignation. >>> it took one of the fbi's most intense manhunts to finally nail mob boss whitey bulger but even behind bars, what damage can he still do? deborah feyerick looks into that. >> i met whitey between the age of 15 and 16. >> reporter: john shay, nicknamed red, grew up in a tight knit world of south boston's old housing colony projects. a golden glove boxer with a wild streak wanted to be just like whitey bulger and the gang
america's independence from britain, we thought we'd check in with some of the royal family. the duke and duchess of cambridge are touring canada. they visited prince edward island today. prince william-- a search-and-rescue pilot-- practiced water landings in a rescue helicopter. the newlyweds also competed against each other in a boat race-- william's boat won. you might think facing a war crimes tribunal would be a sobering experience. but ratko mladic quickly turned the hearing into a courtroom farce. that's next. acing the day with less chronic low back pain. imagine living your life with less chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine you, with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a non-narcotic treatment that's fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people taking maois or thio
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
murdoch's testimony on britain's phone hacking scandal is being challenged. he could face a police investigation. a member of parliament is call forg a police investigation as to whether or not murdoch was involved in the efforts to cover up the scandal. james murdoch said he wasn't aware of an e-mail suggesting the hacking involved more than just one rogue reporter at the the now defunct "news of the world" tabloid. and murdoch says he stands by his statement. >>> the federal aviation administration faces a partial shutdown unless congress has stop gap funding. secretary of transportation says safety will not be compromised. the government will lose every week. >>> the senate today rejected a house republican bill to require congress to slash spending. the cap and balance budget amendment. the move did nothing to resolve the issue of how to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a government default. a short while before the vote house speaker, john boehner, told reporters he and president obama had not reached an agreement on solving the debt crisis. the government is in danger of defau
that led to investigations in both britain and the united states as well as resignation of two of the company's executives. sky news reporter jane do you gole has more on this developing story from london. >> the murdoch empire is not popular. roux part murdoch -- roux port murdoch -- they have been centering around members of parliament or celebrities. it was discovered that a 13-year-old murder victim called millie had her phone hacked into in 2002 while she was missing. rupert murdoch came into britain last week and met with her parents yesterday where we're told he apologized to them face-to-face. the parents were furious at what happened. they had been calling for rebecca brooks, who was the editor of the newspaper who allegedly hacked in, calling for her to resign. she didn't at the time. only 11 days later that she resigned. the reason that the parents were so angry is that while their child was missing, they had been calling and calling her mobile phone, leaving message, begging her to get in contact with them. that filled up her voice mail. whenever anyone calls, it sa
to live as normal a life as they can. bringing a fresh new look to britain's future monarchy. >> i do believe that the tour of canada and the united states of america is the beginning of a real change for the royal family. >> reporter: well, it's canada day here. people are already turning out for the festivities and of course with the hope of catching a glimpse of william and kate. they may have already charmed english speaking canada but their next more significant challenge will be french canada. >> sounds like you better brush up on your french, ben fogle. [ speaking french ]. >> we'll make due. good luck. nbc news has put together a dvd of the event, the ceremony and procession, that balcony kiss. for more on this, go to our website and "today."com. >>> we will atalk about why the defense rested in the casey anthony trial without calling her to testify and what it was like to live in the anthony family home. we'll talk exclusive to casey's one-time bodyguard. >>> but first, this is "today" on nbc. wedding in mon >> live, local, latebreaking. this is bill edl tv 11 news today in b
. this is a lancome makeup ad featuring julia roberts. looks good. it's been banned in great britain along with christy turlington because the images were overly air brushed. fair or unfair. talk about that coming up. >>> let's begin on thursday morning with the time ticking away to reach a deal for the debt ceiling. kelli o'donnell is our capitol hill correspondent. kelli, good morning to you. >> good morning to you. this is a test of john boehner's leadership. he delivered a blunt message to his own republican members to get in line. aides tell me they believe that was more credibility, that was their word, with some of the most conservative members when they retooled their proposal to raise the debt limit and cut spending by going deeper with the cuts, and now, after so much talk, that vote comes today. >> reporter: the politics of chronic gridlock hurts. >> i've had kidney stones that are easier to pass than this. >> reporter: and the prognosis from democrats is dire. >> the speaker's plan is on life support and it's time for him to pull the plug. >> reporter: but house speaker john bo
were yet available. more on the phone hacking in britain, david cameron is cutting short an african trip and ordering a special parliamentary session, extending the session on the start of a scheduled summer recess for emergency meeting on wednesday. this following the resignation of britain's top police officer and the rest of rebekah brooks, the former ceo of rupert murdoch's news international. mr. murdoch, his son james and ms. brooks are set to testify before a parliamentary inquiry tomorrow. you can hear it live at 9:30 a.m. eastern here on c-span radio. those are some of the latest headlines. >> had ever visited the library of congress? over 2 million people have and now this is your chance to tour the world's largest library. tonight, join c-span for a rare glimpse inside the library of congress. we will take you into the great hall and explore the main reading room. unique books and rare books and special collections including original books from thomas jefferson's personal collection. but we will see how the library is using modern technology to discover hidden secrets and
, male gland voters -- male land owners. only a loan -- the nobility and great britain had a voice in parliament. and the democracy that have gone on in great britain largely from our example. so that they have representative government in bright -- great mac britain announces such an extent that the house of lords has almost no sway at all. that is learning from their american cousins. host: let us get a response from our guest, karlyn bowman. guest: america has been a beacon to the world and so many ways. americans, when they are asked about democracy promotion, that are skeptical that -- that we know enough to do it a broad and skeptical of the result but certainly they believe the world would be a safer and better place if there were more democracies. i did the caller is also correct that the military, as he said, is very differently regarded ban after vietnam. somebody like david petreaus is one of the most popular people in american life. i think that speaks to the kind of sacrifices he has main, that all those people in the military are making. host: yet those in congress gr
. be careful out there. >> balmy. >>> pretty hot in the uk as this continues, this story here. britain's prime minister will feel the heat as he answers questions from parliament about the phone-hacking scandal. that's after media mogul rupert murdoch and his son testified yesterday. the bbc's nick robinson reports from london. >> reporter: the policemen, in case you wondered, are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take them in for questioning. the 80-year-old tycoon's wife wendi was behind him, offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously and protectively at his side throughout. >> i would like to say as well just how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> reporter: they were sorry. they were humble. but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> mr. murdoch, do you accept ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you are not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: who that was, he wouldn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe i
. >>> new developments on britain's phone hacking scandal involving a top-selling tabloid. >>> that plus business before the bell when "morning joe" returns. [ grunts ] [ male announcer ] built like a volkswagen. the 2011 tiguan. [ grunts ] [ jim ] i need to push out a software upgrade. build a new app for the sales team in beijing. and convince the c.e.o. his email will find him... wherever he is. i need to see my family while they're still awake. [ male announcer ] with global services from dell, jim can address his company's i.t. needs through custom built applications, cloud solutions and ongoing support in over 100 countries. so his company sees results. and jim sees his family. dell. the power to do more. ♪ >>> making the front pages of the british newspaper s today, hacking scandal involving one of their own. david cameron is calling for an investigation into news corp. police believe the widows of iraq war victims were targeted by one of the company's tabloids, the news of the world. this comes after allegations that the news of the world hacked into the cell phone of a 13-year
the british prime minister's information, the royal family, victims of crimes in great britain and others attempting to do the same thing with an investigator here in the united states. i see a member of parliament speak to that as well. and i see scotland yard having an investigation of over 5,000 names and several thousand phone numbers. that adds up to me to sufficient enough concern to protect the families of 9/11 and make sure that either this was not true, in which case they can have that sense of security, that their messages from those loved ones on their final days does not in any way revealed. or if it is true, that it should be prosecuted in the united states because access to phone record, unauthorized access to them is punishable under federal law. >> senator jay rockefeller says my bet is we'll find criminal stuff here. you share that view? >> well, i don't want to jump to conclusions, john, but i do want a vigorous review. i see there are some published reports that the fbi is in fact pursuing a review to determine whether a full investigation is necessary. i welcome that.
, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before we end the rebuttal portion of this debate, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a century of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so the issue is whether it is possible to
broke the story a few weeks ago. my website. basically they are going to fly the flag for britain and pass around the hat for their various charities. prince william is going to play the polo match. they are going to a a new media conference and they are hosting a black tie dinner for the film industry. >> for british film industry. they are coming all this way across the pond and they are only going to be in california. why is that? >> california traditionally royal family goes, queen's visited and -- prince andrew's visit a pew years ago. and -- it is a place where they would like to raise money for their charities also because it is -- very affluent and influential state. they can get hold of moverers and shakers will. >> i got you. they are going to be meeting saturday with a bunch of celebs at the gala. meeting with tom hanks and nicole kidman will be there as well. >> new film desperate to sell as well. >> right. i mean -- lot has been made of this that they are down to earth and really mingle well with people and are a sensation wherever they go. now they are going to be ru
. yesterday britain's prime minister said it wasn't just foot dragging by the police. >> the truth is, to coin a phrase, we've all been in this together, the press, the politicians and leaders of all the passes, yes, including me. >> reporter: while "the news of the world" will print its last edition tomorrow, the fallout from this affair has just begun. on the business side, a multibillion-dollar takeover bid by the murdoch family of a huge satellite television operation here in britain has already been delayed and it could be in serious trouble. russ? >> elizabeth palmer in london, thank you. >>> and joining us from london is steve eulitz and mark lewis, lawyer for the family of 13-year-old milly dowler whose phone was hacked after her murder, the incident that ignited the scandal. nothing is going to bring back their little girl but is the dowler family getting any satisfaction by the fact that "news of the world" is closing? >> there's no really satisfaction. it was cruelty upon cruelty that the announcement of "news of the world" was ceasing without them being warned about this, they tend
-war britain yts. and a professor looks at the issues of civil rights in the early 199 's. get the complete weekend schedule at c-span.org/history. this weekend on c-span -- live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker, thomas friedman, talks competitiveness and the economy. look for live coverage saturday at 5:30 eastern and sunday at 1:30 eastern. the national governors association, this weekend online on c-span radio and on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on your screen is congressman john carter, republicans of texas, and as i mentioned before the break, he is a member of the house appropriations committee and also serves as secretary leadership position to the republican conference in the house. well, there's a headline, congressman, on politico, panicky hill scramble for deal. are you feeling a sense of panic about the situation? guest: there's a lot of tension. you can't deny the tension that is everywhere. a lot of the debate is taking place behind closed doors. many people are wondering what's going on. they
saw the conflict with britain, what was the sugar act? it was something, it was a law passed to favor the british sugar planters, this wealthy group of men who mostly live in london and hobnob with members of parliament. what's the stamp act? the an act to pass taxes from the rich -- namely the british -- to the poor which you always are when you're about to be taxed, but the poor, midling colonist. and the tea act, what is it? is it's favoritism on behalf of parliament for the shareholders of the east india tea company. so there's the government being oppressive, the parliament, and i think it's important to understand what the revolution was about for many ordinary patriots was this effort to set up governments of their own, that their problem was that their governments lacked the power to protect the people and promote their prosperity. and that to understand the movement solely as anti-government is to understand it really halfway and partly from the point of view of the most well-to-do who are always the ones who can do without less government and not from the point of view of th
what that music means? royal action for you on a friday morning. brita britain's duke and duchess of europe. cbs news reporter is in ottawa this morning, lucie van oldenbarneveld has more. >> reporter: thousands of very excited onlookers greeted the duke and duchess of cambridge and waiting hours to do so them and they sure didn't disappoint. prince william and catherine stepped off a canadian military plane early in the afternoon on thursday into brilliant sunshine and brisk winds an adoring crowd. >> oh, my heart stopped a beat! i was so excited! i was jumping and screaming! love them. >> reporter: after meeting prime minister stephen harper, their first stop was a national war memorial to lay a wreath and visit the troops. then a speech in french. william apologized for his language skills and promised he would get better. >> it will improve as we go on. >> reporter: a scheduled barbecue with 120 canadian volunteers were moved indoor because of the rain. there, the couple mingled with the crowd. kate who is not scheduled to speak publicly during the trip seemed to have plenty t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)